Proud Race

Deep In The Trenches (Primary School Stories)

Selected stories selected from Deep In The Trenches that are Primary School Friendly.

 

This section contains images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including servicemen and women and community members, who are now deceased.

This may cause distress to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family and community members, including students and staff.

While tens of thousands of Australians remember white Diggers in a ceremony at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, less than one percent of such a crowd know about an informal ceremony which has run since 1998 and commemorates Aboriginal soldiers.



SEVENTY years after he died on the Kokoda track, Australian soldier Frank "Dick" Archibald is finally being called home.

After completing the pilot Defence Indigenous Development Program (DIDP) in December 2009, Private Anthony Baker from the North-West Mobile Force (NORFORCE) has gone from strength to strength.

Private George Beale was born in Quirindi, New South Wales, in 1904. In June 1941, along with his younger brother Frederick, George enlisted in the Australian Army. George and Frederick were sent to the 2/20th Battalion, to defend the Malay peninsula in 1941. However, the Japanese forces drove the British forces into Singapore. In1942 the Beale brothers, along with thousands of others, were captured by the Japanese and became prisoners of war and were later sent to Japan, to work in the Naoetsu Camp. Here George worked in a steel mill under extremely harsh conditions. Prisoners were forced to run to and from the mill, a mile from the camp, on an inadequate diet. They often worked long shifts, frequently a full 24 hours, in inadequate clothing and often barefoot.

Alfred Cameron was a son of Alfred Cameron and Jessie Cameron (nee Forrest). He was born at Brinkley Station near Wellington on 17 May 1890.[1] His father was a shearer and highly respected foundation member of the Australian Worker's Union.